Tuesday, May 14, 2024

WING BEAN RECIPE

WINGED BEAN (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) also known 'Kacang Botor' or 'Kecipir' in Malaysia or as Goa bean, four-angled bean, four-cornered bean, Manila bean, Mauritius bean is a tropical legume plant native to New Guinea. This plant grown in Malaysia commercially in which recorded about 180 hectare CHE in 2018 for domestic market. It grows lavishly in hot, humid countries such as the Philippines and Indonesia to India, Burma, Thailand and Sri Lanka. It is a climbing plant in the Fabaceae family and similar in appearance and growth habit to the ordinary garden pole bean. Almost all the parts of the plant including immature pods, mature seeds, tender leaves and shoots, flowers and tubers are used in the East-Asian cuisine. Leaves can be eaten like spinach, flowers can be used in salads, tubers can be eaten raw or cooked, and seeds can be used in similar ways as the soybean. Wing beans offer an abundance of essential nutrients, including protein, complex carbohydrates, B vitamins, calcium, iron and fiber due to which it is found grown throughout the world. In the blog "Anim Agriculture Technology" write abut the recipe of Wing Bean or Kacang Botor.

Recipe of Winged bean

1. Grilled Winged Beans With Miso Dipping Sauce

The ingredients are Miso Dipping Sauce, 1/4 cup shiro-miso (white miso), 1/4 cup mirin (sweet sake), 1/4 cup rice vinegar, 2 tsp dark sesame oil, 2 tbsp vegetable oil, 1 tbsp finely grated ginger and 1 scallion, trimmed and minced. For winged bean preparation require 1 tbsp vegetable oil, 1 tsp dark sesame oil, 1 pound winged beans, Salt and Freshly ground black pepper. The directions in a bowl, whisk together the shiro-miso (usually present in refrigerated cases at natural food stores), mirin and rice vinegar until smooth. Add some sesame and vegetable oils, ginger and scallion; stir till well mixed. Set aside. In a separate bowl, combine the vegetable and sesame oil. Lightly brush the winged beans using the combined oils. Sprinkle to taste with salt and pepper. Prepare a medium-hot fire in a charcoal grill, or preheat a gas grill to 400 degrees (medium high). Put the vegetables crosswise directly on the grill grate. Grill, turning frequently until just crisp, about 3 minutes. Serve the grilled winged beans together with the miso dipping sauce on the side.


2. Stir-Fried Winged Beans with Tomato and Garlic

The ingredients are 1/4 cup vegetable oil, 6 cloves garlic, thinly sliced, dried red chiles, to taste, 1 pound winged beans (kacang botol), cut into bite-sized lengths, 1/2 teaspoon Kosher salt, 1 large tomato, diced, 1 tablespoon soy sauce (gluten-free if needed) and 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil. The directions bya heating a wok or perhaps your largest skillet over maximum heat. Add the oil, and when it is shimering, add some garlic and chilis. Stir-fry for ten seconds, without burning, and immediately add some winged beans and salt. Stir-fry for about 30 seconds, till the beans brighten in color. Add the tomatoes and stir-fry about 30 more seconds, before the tomatoes just slightly begin to break down and form a sauce. Remove from heat. Stir within the soy sauce and toasted sesame oil. Taste and adjust seasoning and serve immediately.


3. Sauteed Winged Beans

The ingredients are 1 lb winged beans or green beans (cleaned, ends trimmed), 2 Tbsp chopped garlic, 3 Tbsp soy sauce (I used low sodium soy sauce), 2 tsp oyster sauce  black pepper and salt to taste.  The directions by saute garlic over medium heat, until lightly browned. Add beans, soy sauce and oyster sauce and mix. Cover pan along with lid and cook over medium heat until beans are tender although not mushy, about 5-6 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste.


4. Hot and Spicy Winged Beans

The ingredients are 15 winged beans (cut into small sections) and for seasonings required 1/2 tbsp chili sauce (suitable for vegetarians), 1/2 tbsp vegetarian belacan powder, 1/4 tsp salt and 1/4 tsp sugar. Directions by heat oil, saute vegetarian belacan powder as well as chili sauce until fragrant. Add winged beans, salt and sugar; stir evenly and briefly cover the pan. Add water and quickly cover the pan again. Saute till fragrant, dish out and serve.


5. Fried Wing Beans

This is the simoplest wingbean cooking. Ingredients 10 wing beans, sliced sideways into 1cm length, 2 red chillies, seeded and sliced (might be replaced along with 1 rounded teaspoon sambal belacan), 2 tablespoon dried prawns, soaked and chopped finely, 3 cloves garlic, minced, 2 tablespoon cooking oil, ½ tablespoon light soya sauce and 100 ml hot water. Directions started with heat oil. Stir-fry the dried prawns till somewhat brown and fragrant. Add the minced garlic and stir-fry for 20 secs. Toss in the wing beans and sliced chilles. Stir-fry for 1 min. Add add hot water and light soya sauce to taste and continue to stir-fry quickly for 15 seconds (this is to keep the beans crunchy). Dish up and serve hot with steamed rice.


6. Ginisang Sigarilyas

The ingredients are 1 bunch winged beans(sigarilyas), sliced 300 grams chicken fillet or halal meat, 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 onion (chopped), 2 tablespoons fermented fish sauce, 1 cup water or chicken/ halal meat stock, 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, salt and pepper to taste. The way to cook in a pan, heat oil and saute garlic and onion. Add chicken fillet or halal meat and stir cook till brown then season along with fish sauce and pepper. Pour water and bring to boil then add sigarilyas. Cook for 3-5 minutes or until cook then adjust seasoning in accordance with taste. Remove from heat then serve with steamed rice. Enjoy.Thanks...
 
By,
M Anem,
Putrajaya,
Malaysia.
(Written in August 2020).
Published on 14 May 2024.

Tuesday, May 7, 2024

THE SSL STRATEGY OF PADDY IN MALAYSIA

The Malaysian government had targeted for the rice industry in the country to achieve 100% rice self-sufficiency where Malaysia’s rice Self-Sufficiency Level (SSL) is currently at 65% to 75%. Thus, the government had implemented few policies to increase the rice production in Malaysia in order to meet the growing demand of rice. In this paper, the effect of price support on the rice production system in Malaysia is investigated. This study utilizes the system dynamics approach of the rice production system in Malaysia where the complexity of the factor is interrelated and changed dynamically through time. Scenario analysis was conducted using system dynamics model by making changes on the price subsidy to see its effect on the rice production and rice SSL. The system dynamics model provides a framework for understanding the effect of price subsidy on the rice self-sufficiency level. The scenario analysis of the model shows that a 50% increase in the price subsidy leads to a substantial increase in demand as the rice price drops. Accordingly, the local production increases by 15%. However, the SSL slightly decreases as the local production is insufficient to meet the large demand. This article in "Anim Agriculture Technology" I would like to share about the SSL strategy and government allocation for paddy industry in Malaysia.


The Ministry of Agriculture and Security Food through the 2023 Budget received a total of RM1.6 billion to support the efforts of paddy production in the country is secured. The allocation will be used for various subsidies and incentives such as controlling the price of rice, and providing fertilizer for paddy that can assist farmers in keeping their costs manageable. 
Minister Datuk Seri Haji Mohamad Sabu said in line with the implementation of the National Agro-Food Policy 2021-2030 (AND 2.0) to increase production capacity and reduce dependence on imported sources, the food security agenda will continue to give emphasis through several initiatives, especially the benefits to rice farmers nationwide. Out of the RM1.6 billion allocation, RM228 million will benefit 240 thousand paddy farmers who will receive a contribution of RM200 per month for a period of three months or seasonally. In addition, Bernas will also share 30 percent of the net profit from rice imports with rice farmers. In ensuring the country’s rice production is secured, MAFS initiated the Smart Large Scale Paddy Field (Smart SBB) program with the aim to increase the average yield of rice per hectare national to 7 metric tons under the 12th Malaysia Plan. KPKM is actively developing 300,000 hectares of planting area per year in stages through this program. The development of this program was made through the collaboration between KPKM and FGV Integrated Farming Holdings Sdn. Bhd. in Selangor and Perak. However currently, the SBB’s SMART program covered 1,500 hectares in 2022 increasing by 435 percent compared to ​​280 hectares in 2021. Subsequently, 724 rice farmers have benefited from the net return of the rice harvest which increased by 28 percent amounting to RM1,540 per metric ton compared to RM1200 before. Thanks...

By,
M Anem,
Senior Agronomist,
Putrajaya,
Malaysia.
(August 2023).

Thursday, May 2, 2024

ISSUE TO GROW ONIONS IN MALAYSIA

SHALLOT (Allium cepa) was an important ingredient in many Malaysian cuisine. Malaysia is a net importer of shallots and onions since years before due to there was no commercial farm grow this commodity. However, according to local newspaper reported that there is strategy to reduce onion imports: 1,000 metric tons of locally grown shallots expected.  Malaysia is expected to produce 1,000 metric tonnes of shallots under the pre-commercial phase of its onion cultivation development programme. Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security stated that the strategy in reducing the nation's dependence on imported red onions would be implemented in two phases that namely the pre-commercial phase and the commercial phase. The pre-commercial phase aims to explore the potential of cultivating shallots in Malaysia. The report mention that it involves an implementation period of two years known as from 2024 (this year) to 2025 (next year).  A total of 70 metric tonnes of shallots seeds and 230kg of seed grains will be supplied by the MARDI in this phase. For the planting programme, an area of 100ha of onion cultivation will be developed, which is 50ha this year and another 50ha next year, with an expected production yield of five metric tons per hectare. This onion planting would be carried out twice a year, with expected onion production for this phase being 1,000 metric tons. The target how the ministry's strategy to achieve the goal of reducing onion imports by 30 per cent. Under the commercial phase, Mohamad said the implementation period is five years, starting from 2026 to 2030. During this period, an area of 1,347ha of onion cultivation will be developed with an expected production yield of 14,470 metric tons in which this would be able to meet 30 per cent of the local demand by 2030. The cultivation of shallots has begun in the Farmers' Organisation Authority areas in Perlis and Selangor covering 1.2ha and in Ladang Bikam in Perak that covering for one hectare and the first harvest is expected in April 2024. Malaysia currently depended on imported onions from India, the Netherlands, China, Pakistan and Thailand. The types of fresh onions imported include large onions, small shallots and garlic. In 2022 reported that Malaysia imported 687,000 metric tons of onions valued at RM1.58 billion. Of that amount about 38,000 metric tons of shallots were imported and valued at RM81.5 million to meet domestic consumption needs. The per capita consumption of small shallots for the year 2022 was 1.2 kg/person/year. This morning, I write an article in "Anim Agriculture Technology" about the issue of how to grow onions in Malaysia and the strategy needed.


According to portal bernama.com titled 'MARDI to monitor BAW-1 shallot variety growth and production' related to this topic. The Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI) has been instructed to closely monitor the growth and production of the new shallot variety BAW-1, which is being cultivated in Perak, in a bid to reduce reliance on imports. Ministry of Agriculture and Food Security said the data obtained later could assist the ministry in formulating a plan for large-scale cultivation of this local red onion. The BAW-1 variety and along with BAW-2 and BAW-3 are the three new shallot varieties introduced by MARDI last year in 2023. Reported that on Jan 24 this year, the Agriculture Development started cultivating the BAW-1 variety at a one-hectare site in Kuala Bikam, Batang Padang, Perak. The onion supply crisis in 2020 had caused by a major flood in India, resulted in over 30 per cent increase in onion prices in the market, rising from RM6 to RM8 per kilograms. The ministry would focus on strengthening the onion industry this year in 2024. MARDI has been instructed to closely monitor the growth and production of the new shallot variety BAW-1 in which is being cultivated in Perak in a bid to reduce reliance on imports. As planned that  the ministry in formulating a plan for large-scale cultivation of this local red onion. Today the BAW-1 variety, along with BAW-2 and BAW-3 are variety developed by MARDI. Reported the onion supply crisis in 2020, caused by a major flood in India in which it resulted in an over 30% increase in onion prices in the market, rising from RM6 to RM8 per kg. The onion industry this year by having Mardi distribute shallot seeds to selected farmers for extensive cultivation of local shallots this year. Bernama recently reported Mardi senior research officer had saying the institute aims to achieve a total shallot production of 30 tons per season on a 5ha cultivation area this year in 2024. The commercialisation activities will be expanded by an additional 10ha each subsequent year, with continuous monitoring and advisory services by Mardi experts until entrepreneurs can fully implement it started shallot cultivation area in Kuala Bikam. To achieve this goal few selected farmers are provided with technical guidance through courses and training, along with free shallot seeds for the first season of production. The planting activity will monitor by few officers for the correct planting and watering methods before assessing the crop’s performance and how it can overcome insect attacks and diseases. Later they will conduct a final monitoring of the cultivation and observe the harvesting process to ensure that the shallots are of high quality and are comparable to those in the market. As reported that a total of 1.5 tonnes of BAW-1 shallots were successfully handed over to a farmer named Tan Cheng Choy, who cultivates the crop on a one-hectare area. Tan described the assistance with shallot seeds as highly beneficial to smallholders like himself, besides increasing their monthly income. He hopes this shallot cultivation will yield substantial results because shallots are in high demand in the market. A large-scale onion cultivation has been implemented in Perak’s Batang Padang district and at Serdang, Selangor by the Agriculture Department. Source:NST. Thanks....
By,
M Anem,
Putrajaya,
Malaysia.
(April 2024)

Saturday, April 20, 2024

FIELD RATS AND MOUSE IN MALAYSIA (PART 3)

RAT
or TIKUS (in Malay) was a medium-sized and long-tailed rodents. Rat species are found throughout the order Rodentia. Stereotypical rats are found in the genus Rattus in which it includes some of the better-known species of rat such as the brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) and the black rat (Rattus rattus). As I know the Rice-field rat or known as the Malayan wood rat, the T greater bandicoot, greater bandicoot, the lesser bandicoot and the rice-field mouse are serious pests of ricefields, oil palm plantations and other field crops in Malaysia. These same five species are distributed throughout Southeast Asia. The ricefield rat and the Malaysian wood rat used to be treated as subspecies of Rattus rattus and were known as Rattus rattus argentiventer and Rattus rattus jalorensis. They are now recognized as separate species (Rattus argentiventer) and Rattus tiomanensis respectively. The bandicoots are large ground rats that build extensive burrows. In Malaysia two species occur they are the greater bandicoot (Bandicota indica) and the lesser bandicoot (B. bengalensis). The fifth species is the field mouse (Mus caroli) similar to the house mouse (Mus musculus) in size. In the question of what rat does in rice field usually the rats cut or pull up transplanted plants. They also chop down the young seedlings. At booting stage, they feed on rice panicles. On the other hand, during ripening stage, they feed on developing rice grains. Rats are found in lowland irrigated rice crops. Both the wet and dry seasons are favorable for rat reproduction and crop damage. In rainfed rice crops rodents have their greatest impact in the wet season. The availability of food, water, and shelter are the factors, which provide optimum breeding conditions. The presence of grassy weeds also triggers their development. Rice field rats feed at night with high activity at dusk and dawn. At daytime, they are found among vegetation, weeds, or maturing fields. During fallow period, they utilize major channels and village gardens as prime habitats. At tillering, 75% of time they are in burrows along the banks and after maximum tillering, 65% of time they are in rice paddies. Rat damage in the rice crop can be observed by the following symptoms such as missing germinating seeds, missing hills chopped young seedlings, missing plants, irregular cuttings of stem, chewed developing buds or ripening grains, tillers cut near base at 45° angle, retillering of stems, delayed grain maturity, missing grains and missing panicles. The feeding damage on the stem caused by the rice field rats may resemble insect damage although rat damage is usually distinguished by the clean cut at 45° of the tiller. The damage on the grains is similar to bird damage. Check muddy areas for runways, active burrows, and footprints of rice field rats. These are usually near the damage they have created. Check for presence of rice field rats: cut tillers and active holes on the bunds that surround the fields. When possible, catch rats to identify the species. Place traps along runways or dug the rats from their burrows. This technical article in "Anim Agriculture Technology" I wrote about field rats and their species that found in Malaysia as a source of agronomic practices for all.

On issue of the reproductive capacity that reported in local media in which in S
elangor and Negri Sembilan for the period 1948 - 1952 about 250 mature females of the ricefield rat and the Malaysian wood rats were examined. The pregnant females made up 14% of the ricefield rat and 12.5% of the Malaysian wood rat. in all quarters of the year, without significant seasonal variation in number. Litter size was 5-8, mean 7 for the ricefield rats, and 4-10, mean 6 for the Malaysian wood rat. Similar to the house rats (Rattus rattus diardii, R. norvegicus, R. exulans) in which the sexual maturity of young ricefield and Malaysian wood rat is reached in about 90 days of age, and the rats are reproductive by the fourth month. Studies by local universities indicated a mean length of life in the wild for R. argentiventer of 6.2 months and for R. tiomanicus of 3.6 months. Pregnant females of Bandicoota indica from Kedah and Perlis (three instances), were found to have litter size of 5 -10. The litter size of B. bengalensis (four instances) from Penang was 7 - 11. B. indica in Vietnam 3 - 8, Thailand 4 - 9. B. bengalensis in Vietnam 2 -12 and Burma 6-11. Males attain sexual maturity at body weight of 284 gram, females at 186 g for B. indica. Pregnant females of Mus caroli have been recorded with litter size 5-6 in Vietnam.

Do you know there are people eating rats as sources of food?.
During World War II reported that when meat was not easily available in a large forest and field rats of 250 g and above were trapped for food. Among the field rats are the greater bandicoot rat (Bandicota indica) in the ricefields were the prime choice for consumption by some ethnic groups in Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Myanmar, China and India. In the study conducted by experts in listed country reported that they tasted some properly boiled meat of the forest giant rats including the greater bandicoot rat and found the meat to be bland in contrast with that of domesticated mammals.

Talk about rats related to rodent-borne diseases. Reported that the four species of field rats with the exception of the field mouse, like the house rats, are reservoir hosts of diseases to man; such as waterborne diseases (leptospirosis), bacterial diseases (plague), rickettsia diseases (scrub and murine typhus), helminthic diseases (angiostrongyliasis, echinostomiasis , hymenolepiasis, trichninellosis) and viral diseases (haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, rat-bite fever). Among these diseases, leptospirosis is the most prevalent among the field rats. As for the field mouse, information of its public health importance is not available. In Malaysia, the ricefield rat (Rattus argentiventer), greater bandicoot rat (Bandicota indica) and the ricefield mouse (Mus caroli) are habitat-specific and major rice field pests. The latter two species B. indica and M. caroli are confined to the northern parts of Peninsular Malaysia only, thus damage to rice production is restricted. R. argentiventer known is widely distributed through all the states of Malaysia, and the destruction to the productivity of rice is thirteen fold that of the other two species. The Malaysian wood rat (R. tiomanicus) is non habitat-specific, but with preference for oil palm and is a major pest in oil palm estates. This rat and the house rats, like Rattus rattus diardii, R. norvegicus and R. exulans are also intermittent visitors to ricefields. The lesser bandicoot rat (B. bengalensis), on the other hand, is restricted to Penang island. It is an outdoor resident in urban and suburban areas, and has yet been trapped in ricefield plots despite several fauna inventories by IMR in the 60’s and 70’s, and DWNP (Department of Wildfile and National Parks) in the 1990s. During the period 1950-1970, bio-ecological studies on the house and field rodents were conducted in Peninsular Malaysia (then Malaya) by four research organizations. The Institute for Medical Research (IMR) hosted two research units: the Scrub Typhus Unit headed by Professor J.L. Harrison, and the U. S. Army Medical Research Unit headed by Colonel R. Traub of the Walter Reed Medical School, U.S.A. These two units were working on the scrub typhus disease of which house and field rodents are reservoir hosts. In the latter part of this period, Mr. Brian J. Wood of the Sime Darby organization carried out studies on rodent pests in oil palm plantations, while the Agriculture Department in Serdang under Dr. W.P. Ting worked on rodent pests in rice fields, orchards and plantations. These pioneer researchers developed various control methods on rodent pests particularly in oil palm estates, and also paved the way for bio-medical studies on rodent-borne diseases by research scientists in the universities. Since the late 1960s, deforestation has been rampant for the expansion of oil palm. At the same time, large plots of rice and rubber have been converted to oil palm. This has resulted in changes in the behavior of fauna. A good example is the common tree-shrew (Tupaia glis), once confined to forest and forest fringe habitats, now well-adapted to plantations. It has also become a common animal in urban parks and gardens. Similar adaptation by some rodent species (rats, squirrels, small carnivores) and other vertebrate species such as amphibians and reptiles to plantations, particularly oil palm plantations, is to be expected. 
This article devided in three segments namely Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3 respectively. Thanks...all.

By,
M Anem,
Senior Agronomist,
Putrajaya,
Malaysia.
(January 2024).

Tuesday, April 16, 2024

FARMERS SUFFER RM111 M LOSES DUE TO FLOODS

IN MALAYSIA RECENTLY
farmers suffer RM111 million losses due to recent flood in late 2023 and early 2024. Reported that the damages covered 24,500ha of land involving some 12,000 farmers and breeders nationwide. The country's agriculture and agro-food sector suffered about RM111.95 million in losses following the recent monsoon season this year. Agriculture and Food Security reported that the damages covered 24,500ha of land involving some 12,000 farmers and breeders nationwide. It was informed that the recent flood was among the worst in the history after 2014 and many farmers and breeders have suffered huge losses. Also a total of 350 ministry staff were also affected and despite that, some of them have continued their duty as usual. However, to help the farmers the ministry has provided various types of assistance via its 'Prihatin Programmes' and this includes 'ready to cook and ready to eat' kits. More than 10,000 kits worth about RM1 million were provided for the purpose in Kota Bharu Kelantan during the launching ceremony. The government would ensure sufficient food supplies in the country in which the government did not face any problem in the food supply after the monsoon season. In case of the shortage of eggs is almost recovered when we started importing it recently while the price of chicken is also back to normal. In the blog I am ready to write in "Anim Agriculture Technology" the effect of floods in Malaysia inccured losses to farmers a reported by local media.


Bernama reported that 'Setiu paddy farmers in dire straits after floods wipe out crops' in which chief spokesman for the paddy farmers of Kampung Buluh Hilir and Kampung Buruk, Che Aziz Che Hami (centre) with Mohammad Khairul and Daud inspecting crops destroyed by the recent monsoon floods at Setiu, Terengganu. The recent monsoon floods destroyed the crops of 26 paddy farmers at two villages here with total losses amounting to approximately RM52,000. Chief spokesman for the paddy farmers of Kampung Buluh Hilir and Kampung Buruk, Che Aziz Che Hamid, said that the losses cover 80 acres out of the 300 acres of crops which could not be harvested in time. This is due to the earlier-than-expected rainfall which flooded the paddy fields, destroying the crops which had yet to be harvested in time. It has caused a lot of hardship for the affected farmers. He added that the farmers had anticipated the torrential rain, but could not finish harvesting the affected area before the floodwaters came.  Some of them had begun harvesting their crops since Nov 11 when their paddy had matured, but they did not manage to complete their job before the monsoon hit. Aziz blamed several other factors which have added to the farmers’ misery. Among them are pathways that were damaged by the floods; and the unsystematic mobilisation of harvesting machines which have disrupted the harvesting process. Additionally, the farmers faced difficulty in marketing their harvested crops owing to complicated procedures and inadequate buyers. This had an effect on sales and revenue for the farmers. M
any of the affected farmers are desperately trying to harvest their flooded fields in the hope of salvaging some of their crops. The farmers are attempting to salvage whatever they can after putting in a lot of work planting the paddy. Some lucky farmers may be able to push their lower-quality harvest at lower prices on the market, rather than suffer total loses. They also fear the second wave of monsoon flooding, which may lead to heavier consequences and losses. Farmers hopes the authorities will step in to offer some form of compensation to reduce the financial burdens of the paddy farmers.

On news.nst.com reports '
More than nine hundred farmers apply for assistance following RM17 million in losses due to floods in Johore' are relevant to this article.  A total of 929 farmers in the state have applied for flood relief aid following losses of over RM17 million due the floods last March, the Johor state assembly was told today. A total of 929 farmers in the state have applied for flood relief aid following losses of over RM17 million due the floods. The allocation for the flood relief aid is under the ministry's programme of Agro-Food Project Redevelopment Programme (PPSPA) about the issue on 704 flood relief applications involving the cultivation of crops, vegetables, fruits, honey bees, mushrooms and Agro-Based Industries (IAT) and losses were estimated at RM10.3 million. Based on the applications, Segamat suffered the highest amount of losses at RM2.363 million, followed by Tangkak RM2.156 million; as Batu Pahat incurred losses of RM1.844 million. All these applications have been raised during the state-level Disaster Technical Committee Meeting in April for confirmation and were then referred for state and federal resource allocations. A total of 60 operators in the fishery sector were affected by the floods involving losses of about RM5.234 million. The Johor state assembly sitting was adjourned until a date to be determined.  Thanks...
By,
M Anem,
Putrajaya,
Malaysia.
(January 2024).

Thursday, April 11, 2024

PRICE CONTROL - RELATION TO FOOD SECURITY

IT THAT TRUE
 
that price controls hinder achieving food security? However, reported that one factor contributing to the urgency to be food secure is the rising cost of food. Food security is a global agenda. and one factor contributing to the urgency to be food secure is the rising cost of food. No doubt, the factor of supply chain disruption through the flare ups of conflicts around the world has contributed much to the price rise. The bigger concern is the ready availability and the affordability of food itself. For Malaysia, the over dependence on import has become a national concern. Not to mention the ballooning of the food import bill which creates more stress on the economy. We have for years resorted to price control to cushion the impact of high food prices on the population. Price controls, while well-intentioned normally are generally not the most effective way to achieve food security. Reported that the announcement in budget 2024 to phase out the price control on eggs and chicken is viewed as a positive sign to boost local production. This article in "Anim Agricuture Technology" I will discuss on the proce control hinder achieving food security

The economists agree that price controls can create market distortions. When prices are fixed below the market equilibrium actually the producers are discouraged from producing because of low margin and can lead to shortages as later the consumers buy more due to lower prices. This imbalance can disrupt the supply chain and lead to inefficiencies. Price controls can reduce the incentives for farmers to produce more food. When they are not able to fetch fair market prices for their products, they may reduce their output or shift to other more profitable crops. This, in turn, can lead to reduced overall food production. In some cases, price controls can lead to a focus on quantity over quality. Producers may cut costs and compromise on safety and quality standards to maintain profitability when prices are constrained. This is bad for health and nutrition. It is no secret that price controls can lead to black markets or illegal trading. When prices are artificially low, a parallel market with higher prices can emerge, which can exacerbate supply chain issues and hinder government efforts to ensure food security. Price controls do not address the root causes of food insecurity, such as logistical challenges, post-harvest losses, and poor infrastructure. These structural issues need to be addressed separately to improve food security.  Price controls can lead to the misallocation of resources. When the government intervenes in the market to set prices, it may be diverting resources that could be better used in other sectors, such as agriculture infrastructure or technology improvements. It is not rocket economics that price controls often provide short-term relief but do not address long-term food security concerns.

Sustainable food security requires investment in agriculture, research, infrastructure, and education. Implementing and enforcing price controls can be administratively challenging. It requires significant government resources and can be prone to corruption. Market participants may react to price controls by reducing investments, innovations, or production. This can have long-term negative effects on the food supply. Price controls may not account for global market dynamics. Food prices are often influenced by international factors such as weather, trade policies, and global demand. Local price controls may not effectively shield consumers from these global influences. Instead of relying solely on price controls, a more comprehensive approach to achieving food security should include measures like, supporting farmers with infrastructure, technology, and training to increase production and efficiency, and creating efficient and transparent markets that allow supply and demand to determine prices.  Implementing targeted social safety nets that provide assistance to those most in need, rather than trying to control prices for everyone is also an option. Additionally, we can encourage diversified food production and sustainable agriculture practices. Not to mention implementing risk management strategies to address the impact of external factors on food prices. Other measures include investing in research and development to improve crop yields and resilience, and improving transportation, storage, and distribution infrastructure to reduce post-harvest losses and enhance food availability. While price controls may be tempting as a short-term solution, they are not a sustainable strategy for achieving food security in the long run. A combination of market-oriented policies and targeted interventions is generally more effective in addressing the root causes of food insecurity. In fact, price controls hinder food security. Thanks....

SELAMAT HARI RAYA 1 SYAWAL 1445H/ 2024...

By,
M Anem,
Putrajaya,
Malaysia.
(January 2024).
Posted from,
Taman Cendana Melaka.
(2 syawal 1445H)

Wednesday, April 3, 2024

BOILER ASH - A QUALITY ORGANIC COMPOST

OIL PALM BOILER ASH (OPBA)
can be used as an econom- ical and environmentally friendly filler. OPBA is ash derived from shells and fruit fibers which have been ground and later burned at a temperature of 500 to 700∘C in a boiler furnace. As I know in which an o
il palm industry is one of the most prosperous agriculture industry in Malaysia for msany years. The first layer of by-products from oil palm industry are such as mesocarp fibre, palm kernel shell or empty fruit bunch has been used as biomass commodity for heat generation. Boiler Ash is the second layer by-product or agro waste obtains from the biomass boiler. Boiler ash is the residue after the palm kernel shell and empty fruit bunch burnt in the boiler. As now in which boiler ash product considered as a CH Biotech product. It was informed that in CH Biotech, the boiler ash will go through a sieving process for removing the unwanted impurity as well as maintain an uniform size of palm ash. There are several variety of boiler ash and this is segregated by factors such as difference source and such as the boiler ash from bunches or palm kernel shell. The palm ash originated from empty fruit bunch (EFB) also name as bunch ash. Bunch ash is the substance with high level of Potassium. There are difference sellers who name after the bunch ash as fly ash. Actually, they all refer to the same substance. Bunch ash is a demanding organic fertilizer which act as a supplement besides the NPK fertilizer. However in some cases, I refer the palm ash is the ash originated with palm kernel shell or it was a mixture. The palm ash comes black in colour as solid particle. This article in "Anim Agriculture Technology'' blog I would like to share an information of biboiler ash as source of best information.


Reported that the application of Palm Ash was a new finding from a minimum research by local scientist. The research and application study of palm ash is still an on-going progress by many institutes and universities or in selected oil palm estates in Malaysia. The palm ash from CH Biotech is mainly supply for 3 categories namely as for Agriculture Industry in which the Potassium (K) content and alkaline base characteristic is the advantageous for palm ash. Palm ash was spread on peat soil or acidic soil to improve the acidity soil. Boiler Ash known as a better raw material for Zeolite. The rich criteria of silica and alumina are both character of palm ash which could be converted to Zeolite. The challenge which we are facing now about the process cost. The last criteria ablot boiler ash according ti report as a Cement Pigmentation Material. The palm ash normally will go through a specific sieving process before it could become one of the cement raw materials. From many research reported that it shows palm ash could become a supplement cementing material in order to replace up to 20% cement in a concrete. For commercialization actually the packing of Boiler Ash as a CH Biotech in which in Malaysia palm ash are sieved and could deliver to customer under these 3 standard packing method in which it was pack according to customer needs. There are two tyoe of packaging known as in the Loose Form or in Jumbo Gag (55 kg/bag). There are not many local farmers purchase the boiler as product for vegetablu gorwing activity untik today.


For me in which t
here are many organic fertilizer products available in the Malaysia market but how could we determine the product quality.  How could we differentiate the fertilizer is suitable for our crops or not should be cleared. Actually even though there are many factors affecting an organic fertilizer quality, however there are a few areas we could always consider before we make a purchase. An example in which the development of the internet and social media the are easier knowing the manufacturer background for any organic product compost. Via the manufacturer name or product brand most farmers could perform a search at the internet to understand the manufacturer background. Farmers could even go to social media in which it was even easier for you to understand the remarks given by their follower. As an example in which the CH Biotech is an organic fertilizer manufacturer in which many farmers happy to statt using thie product. The details about Organic Compost Product for CH Biotech many able to locate valuable information and products knowledge for agriculture sector. A report stated that an experience organic compost manufacturer should be able giving some guidance in using their organic fertilizer for respective crop. The guidance may not be the ultimate or getting optimize planting result but at least showing our reader the relevant organic fertilizer has been tested in relevant field with proven result. As fair review or testimonial even the better for our user to gain more and better confident about our organic fertilizer products. Many farmers could easily see the progress and development of a remarkable organic fertilizer manufacturer. CH Biotech does not has widen products line but we keep on upgrading our products to suit latest planting needs. CH Biotech is an organic fertilizer manufacturer in Malaysia. We manufacture our own organic compost products, formulate the fortified fertilizer for dedicate crops in Malaysia. We are selling our own organic fertilizer products, on the other hand, we are also doing OEM for any distributor. CH Biotech has comprehensive process setup for quality organic compost and also product quality monitoring system which maintain a consistent product quality. Meanwhile, we are also setting up our online store. In near future, our reader canbuy compost online. You are always encouraged to leave us a message or contact CH Biotech if you have any comments about organic fertilizer products, and we are here to serve you better. Thanks you...


By,
M Anem,
Senior Agronomist Expert,
Impiana Hotel, Senai,
Johor Bahru, Johor,
Malaysia.
(March 2024).