JOM SOKONG BLOG

KLIK SAYA...

Saturday, May 7, 2016

HOW TO MAKE OWN FISH FERTILIZER

FISH FERTILIZER is an awesome product for promoting plant growth. It's high in Nitrogen for growing plants, can be naturally produced, and is an awesome food for microbes! Fungi love this stuff. Fish emulsion is an organic fertilizer. It is a liquid fertilizer made from byproducts of the fish oil and fish meal industry. Fish emulsion is appropriate for many uses in the garden, but is especially useful as a lawn fertilizer in early spring and to feed leafy green vegetables, due to its higher nitrogen content. The NPK ratio for fish emulsion is generally 5-3-3. Fish emulsion is a concentrate, which you dilute with water and apply to your lawn or garden. It can have a strong fishy odor, but deodorized fish emulsion is commonly available as well.

How to make your own fish fertilizer:

1. The first step is to buy fish from reasonable supplier. For that purpose normallya any kind of fish will work. In fact, you might as well use trash fish, or fish discards like fish heads, guts, etc. I like to use whole fishes though as I think that makes for a better product.

2. Second is to throw the fish into a blender to mash it up into little pieces. I cut my fish into 8ths or so and then chuck it into my kitchen blender but I’m a bit of a caveman. If you’re squeamish, buy a separate blender for this, just make sure it is powerful enough, mine is 500W and works fine for small-medium size fishes. Remember, the finer the fish bits, the more effective the fermentation.

3. Than add water. You can use a simple guide of 3:1-3 parts water to 1 part ferment material. 1 roughly 8in tilapia comes to about 500mL when ground up, so I add about 1500mL water.  ALWAYS USE NON-CHLORINATED WATER. Chlorine kills microbes. Simply let your chlorinated tap water sit for several hours, allowing the chlorine to dissipate. I let it sit overnight generally.

4.  If you are using a blender, blend up the mixture. The water helps keep it loose so it blends much better after you add the water.

5. Than add lacto bacilli to blended fish mixture. I use 2tbsp per L. You can use more or less if you want. 2tbsp/L is plenty though. See our lactobacillus recipe for proper preparation and dilution of your lacto serum.

6.  Later add 1/3 parts sugar. This should be 1/3 the amount of fish you’ve added. Sugar will be either molasses or normal cane sugar. Try not to use cane sugar since it is chemically bleached. Raw(unrefined) sugar like muscovado is best. In the Philippines we use molasses because it is cheap, but any glucose source works – syrup, honey, etc. Just use whatever is cheap. Glucose gives microbes energy. Whatever you have access to cheaply, go for it.

7. If using sugar, the equivalency is about 1KG sugar = 1L solution. So if you have 500mL like my tilapia, you want 1/3 of that in sugar. You’d use about 167g sugar, or roughly ¾ cup. The recomended is to blend the whole mixture up a bit. It’s good to have it as fine as possible. Up to you how much you blend it, I blend until I don’t hear so many bones crunching in the blades of the blender.

8. Now you have liquefied fish, sugar, and lacto. Pour this mixture into a container. Loosely cover the container. No need to seal, because the container will explode as CO2 is released by fermentation. You just want to make sure other things don’t get into it. I use a container with a lid and loosely screw the cap on top (just make sure you don’t seal it because it WILL explode).

9. The process takes anywhere from 3 weeks to over a month. How do you know its finished? By the smell. 

10. You know when it’s done when there is no smell anymore. During fermentation there is a nasty smell, but once completed, there will be almost no odor. You can open it, and put your nose right up to it. Take a whiff. Nothing but a faint vinegar smell. Now you know its done. Congratulations! You’ve made your own Fish Hydrolysate!

11. Now, usually I transfer it to a smaller container, usually just a smaller water bottle, just for convenience. At this time, I use a strainer and a funnel to strain the bones and scales out of the hydrolysate. But don’t expect a lot. From a whole 8-10in tilapia, you will only get a little tiny pile of bones/scales. They will feel kind of rubbery, not brittle. Throw these in the compost pile or garden, they are excellent fertilizer and microbe food, already inoculated with microbes!

12. Leave the cap on the strained concoction loose until you see no more little bubbles forming. Then cap it and store it for use as your own natural fertilizer.

Adapted by,
M Anem,
Senior Agronomist,
Taman Cendana, Bandar Melaka,
Melaka, Malaysia.

(30 April 2016)

HOW TO MAKE OWN FISH FERTILIZER

FISH FERTILIZER is an awesome product for promoting plant growth. It's high in Nitrogen for growing plants, can be naturally produced, and is an awesome food for microbes! Fungi love this stuff. Fish emulsion is an organic fertilizer. It is a liquid fertilizer made from byproducts of the fish oil and fish meal industry. Fish emulsion is appropriate for many uses in the garden, but is especially useful as a lawn fertilizer in early spring and to feed leafy green vegetables, due to its higher nitrogen content. The NPK ratio for fish emulsion is generally 5-3-3. Fish emulsion is a concentrate, which you dilute with water and apply to your lawn or garden. It can have a strong fishy odor, but deodorized fish emulsion is commonly available as well.

How to make your own fish fertilizer:

1. The first step is to buy fish from reasonable supplier. For that purpose normallya any kind of fish will work. In fact, you might as well use trash fish, or fish discards like fish heads, guts, etc. I like to use whole fishes though as I think that makes for a better product.

2. Second is to throw the fish into a blender to mash it up into little pieces. I cut my fish into 8ths or so and then chuck it into my kitchen blender but I’m a bit of a caveman. If you’re squeamish, buy a separate blender for this, just make sure it is powerful enough, mine is 500W and works fine for small-medium size fishes. Remember, the finer the fish bits, the more effective the fermentation.

3. Than add water. You can use a simple guide of 3:1-3 parts water to 1 part ferment material. 1 roughly 8in tilapia comes to about 500mL when ground up, so I add about 1500mL water.  ALWAYS USE NON-CHLORINATED WATER. Chlorine kills microbes. Simply let your chlorinated tap water sit for several hours, allowing the chlorine to dissipate. I let it sit overnight generally.

4.  If you are using a blender, blend up the mixture. The water helps keep it loose so it blends much better after you add the water.

5. Than add lacto bacilli to blended fish mixture. I use 2tbsp per L. You can use more or less if you want. 2tbsp/L is plenty though. See our lactobacillus recipe for proper preparation and dilution of your lacto serum.

6.  Later add 1/3 parts sugar. This should be 1/3 the amount of fish you’ve added. Sugar will be either molasses or normal cane sugar. Try not to use cane sugar since it is chemically bleached. Raw(unrefined) sugar like muscovado is best. In the Philippines we use molasses because it is cheap, but any glucose source works – syrup, honey, etc. Just use whatever is cheap. Glucose gives microbes energy. Whatever you have access to cheaply, go for it.

7. If using sugar, the equivalency is about 1KG sugar = 1L solution. So if you have 500mL like my tilapia, you want 1/3 of that in sugar. You’d use about 167g sugar, or roughly ¾ cup. The recomended is to blend the whole mixture up a bit. It’s good to have it as fine as possible. Up to you how much you blend it, I blend until I don’t hear so many bones crunching in the blades of the blender.

8. Now you have liquefied fish, sugar, and lacto. Pour this mixture into a container. Loosely cover the container. No need to seal, because the container will explode as CO2 is released by fermentation. You just want to make sure other things don’t get into it. I use a container with a lid and loosely screw the cap on top (just make sure you don’t seal it because it WILL explode).

9. The process takes anywhere from 3 weeks to over a month. How do you know its finished? By the smell. 

10. You know when it’s done when there is no smell anymore. During fermentation there is a nasty smell, but once completed, there will be almost no odor. You can open it, and put your nose right up to it. Take a whiff. Nothing but a faint vinegar smell. Now you know its done. Congratulations! You’ve made your own Fish Hydrolysate!

11. Now, usually I transfer it to a smaller container, usually just a smaller water bottle, just for convenience. At this time, I use a strainer and a funnel to strain the bones and scales out of the hydrolysate. But don’t expect a lot. From a whole 8-10in tilapia, you will only get a little tiny pile of bones/scales. They will feel kind of rubbery, not brittle. Throw these in the compost pile or garden, they are excellent fertilizer and microbe food, already inoculated with microbes!

12. Leave the cap on the strained concoction loose until you see no more little bubbles forming. Then cap it and store it for use as your own natural fertilizer.

Adapted by,
M Anem,
Senior Agronomist,
Taman Cendana, Bandar Melaka,
Melaka, Malaysia.

(30 April 2016)

Tuesday, May 3, 2016

TYPES OF FISH FERTILIZER

Threre are 3 types of Fish Fertilizers available in the market. Normally the fish fertilizer are processed to FISH MEAL, HYDROLYZED MEAL and FISH EMULSION. This article I would likr to shate the info about this three fish fertilizer. 



(1) Fish Meal:
This fish fertilizer are made from ground-up dried fish byproducts, fish meal supplies nutrients, minerals, and organic matter that condition soil. It’s rich in nutrients but breaks down more gradually than other fish fertilizers, making it a great slow-release soil amendment during planting. Fish meal, or fishmeal, is a commercial product made from fish and the bones and offal from processed fish. It is a brown powder or cake obtained by drying the fish or fishtrimmings, often after cooking, and then grinding it. If it is a fatty fish it is also pressed to extract most of the fish oil
 


(2) Hydrolyzed fish:
Hydrolyzed fish is made by partially-digesting whole fish and fish waste with enzymes. The end product is a sort of compost tea that provides easily-absorbed, potent nutrients, plus amino acids and oils that aren’t present in fish emulsion. Hydrolyzed fish fertilizer is manufactured by a much different process. Basically, 100 percent of the fish product is used for the fertilizer, allowing for more nutrients in your soil and for your plants. A more useful product is obtained from this process, making it more cost effective and longer lasting. There are also more environmental benefits from this this type of fertilizer, as there is little waste and no chemical additives. Hydrolyzed fish fertilizers contain a very low count of N-P-K (nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium), which is ultimately better for the soil. The fertilizer creates no toxic minerals that many high-grade emulsion products tend to have. Seaweed or kelp extract is also often included in the fish fertilizer, which has also been proven to be beneficial to home gardens as well as large crops. The pure economic savings from such a product are worth the purchase, regardless of the more simplified production process and lack of waste. Not only does this type of fertilizer use every piece of the fish, it uses a cold pasteurizing technique that holds all of the most important micro and macro acids and nutrients naturally found in fish.
 



(3) Fish Emulsion:
This is the least potent but most economical form of fish fertilizer, made from the liquid that’s left over after the fish are processed. This liquid fertilizer is used for foliar feeding or soil drenching and provides readily-available nitrogen and small amounts of phosphorus and potassium. Liquid fish fertilizers usually come as a concentrate that you dilute with water and apply with a sprayer, or pour it onto the soil. Fish emulsion fertilizer is made several different ways depending on who is making it. The important thing to know is that fish emulsion goes through two stages of processing. The first stage breaks down the fish parts using enzymes, proteases, or chemicals. Then, and this is the important part, heat is used to break it down further and allow oils and other things like amino acids to be more easily removed. It’s this second stage of processing that makes fish emulsion less advantageous than fish hydrolysate. Fish emulsion fertilizer lacks many oils and proteins that fish hydrolysate fertilizer has in abundance.  
Thanks for reading.


By,
M Anem,
Senior Agronomist,
Taman Cendana, Bandar Melaka,
Melaka, Malaysia.
(30 Aprol 2016)

Saturday, April 30, 2016

USING FISH FERTILIZER

FISH FERTILIZER is a type of fertilizer available in the market. In Malaysia the use of fish fertilizer are common among farmers. Using fresh fish fertilizer to rejuvenate the soil and increase crop yields was not new and in fact the organic farming has rediscovered it. Organic Farming currently are the new approaches to produce safe product with certified as MyORGANIC in Malaysia. The earliest instance dates back to ancient Egypt when farmers used fish to provide fertility to their crops. When settlers from Europe first arrived in North America they discovered the indigenous population placing whole fish in the soil and then planted their crops over top. It was only since the middle of the 20th century that the rise of artificial fertilizers can to prominence, but as the ecological movement of the late 20th century began to take root and spread, the benefits of using this old form of soil and plant rejuvenation started to come back. Fish fertilizers provide an excellent source of nutrition for plants and the soil. When fish fertilizers are used, the plant receives a controlled level of nitrogen, a vital element necessary for the production of chlorophyll and maintaining the health of the plant. Too much nitrogen, which can be a side effect of chemical fertilizers, can overwhelm the plant and cause it to be more vulnerable to weather fluctuations, insects and diseases. It is well known that synthetic nitrogen fertilizers ‘volatilize’ into the atmosphere, not only being lost to plant availability, but contributing to greenhouse gases. Runoff of excess synthetic fertilizers to the water table, aquifers, streams, rivers and our oceans are other negative side effects.
Another major benefit of using a fish fertilizer is improving a healthy food source that stimulates microorganisms that exist in the soil. Some forms of commonly found soil microbes also synthesize nitrogen (e.g. nitrifying bacteria). When fed ‘good food’, they increase in numbers and produce more available organic nitrogen for roots to uptake and naturally feed the plant. An active soil ecosystem will improve the vitality of the crop and increase production of new soil by a factor of six.  Today there are many different kinds of fish fertilizers produced a number of ways. At Great Pacific BioProducts we believe that the method we use to create our Pacific Natural ® fertilizer produces a superior result for our customers. To start with we only use fresh fish in our process. This is supplied year-round through our exclusive relationship with two major nearby B.C.-based fish processing companies. Great Pacific BioProducts uses a hydrolysis process where enzymes break down the fresh fish organic material into a liquid.

Fish emulsions produced by a high heat and evaporation process causes the amino acids in proteins to lose their potency and become less effective for supplying nutrients. The hydrolysis process we employ allows for a greater amount of the fish’s proteins, vitamins and nutrients to be retained and transferred to the crop and soil base. We do not remove the natural oils found in fish, which are commonly removed in the rendering of fish products resulting in fish emulsion products. Our method also makes it easier and quicker for the nutrients to be absorbed by the plant more rapidly, usually within 24-48 hours. As a side benefit the fertilizer also continues to work effectively when colder temperatures closer to the freezing mark are expected. Even in a soil that’s already highly fertile it’s been shown that the addition of a fish fertilizer will increase crop growth and microbial activity. Great Pacific BioProducts strongly believes in the positive impact of using this natural product. We also believe that by using only fresh fish and our hydrolysis process to lock in the higher nutritional components, Pacific Natural ® is the perfect choice for your needs. Farmers in Malaysia use fish fertilizer for vegetables and fruit tree. Thanks.
By,
M Anem,
Senior Agronomist,
Taman Cendana, Bandar Melaka,
Melaka, Malaysia.
(April 2016).

Thursday, March 31, 2016

STARFRUIT - MALAYISAN STAR


Description: https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-XGyA4s_p5I8/VvzV_v3NK-I/AAAAAAAACsU/oOcs_SOeCb0yCMsyRLN1hXKSlmeMRAcKQ/s1600/bel1a.jpg
Description: https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-9QL_CELRukc/VvRzlnZhr9I/AAAAAAAACsA/iQ-EoUFrHFUgiSHITA-LkyivN3oMmIBQw/s1600/belimbing%2B%252811%2529.jpg

STARFRUIT (Averrhoa carambola) is a tropical fruit largely grown in Malaysia. This fruit are produced for domestic and export market. More than 1,600 hectare of star fruit was grown in the state of Selangor, Negeri Sembilan, Pahang and Johor. May be not many of us not known to what is actually Star Fruit. The star fruit or Carrabolla scientific name is Averrhoa carambola from species Oxalidaceae. It is believed native to Malaysia and Southeast Asia. Young star fruit is a light green colour and when it ripens, it turn to yellow and while fully mature, it will be a golden yellow skin. The fruit shape like a star and hold it shape when cut. The young fruit in greenish skin will have salt flavour. The flesh is light yellow to yellow, crisp and juicy. Depended to varieties, its taste between pear, green apple, lemon and grape. How to select a good taste for star fruit? The good fruit is with yellow shiny skin and even colour. When star fruit skin starting turn to brown, dried up, it is going too wicked and avoid buying it. This article in "Anim Agriculture Technology" I share the Information about star fruit.




Varieties of Star Fruit registered in Malaysia according to the plant variety listing by Department of Agriculture Malaysia are about 15 varieties in 2015. There are three varieties recommended for commercial scale that was B2, B10 and B17. Variety B10 consists for about 60% of star fruit grown in Malaysia and the rests are B17. B2 are specifically grown for pollination purposes. Actually two types of star fruit species are grown in Malaysia, sometimes it’s hardly to differential between it as tart variety will have a little sweet as well. For processing of star fruits such as Tart we prefer such as variety B10 that was tend to have narrow space rib. For Sweet the preferred variety are such as B7,B2 and B17 tend to have thick with thickset rib compare to tart variety. How the Star fruit Look Like? It was a simple question but not many people able to answer. The star fruit tree can grow as height 25 feet with yellowish and greenish leaves 2 to 4cm wide and 2 to 9cm long. The aromatic pink to lavender flower diameter approximately 0.95cm.The tree is grow faster and fruit bear heavily in rich loam with well drainage and high humidity climate region. In Malaysia, there grow huge at state Selangor, Johor, Kedah, Perak, Pahang and Sembilan State at season April to June or October-December. For last words Star Fruit Product and Recipes are developed by chef according to the necessity. Below is some of product made from star fruit that was Puree, Dried star fruit as snack, Star fruit flavour cake, Star fruit juice and Star fruit candies.


Why Star Fruit benefits to body?. In Malaysia, you can found many fruit hawker along roadside and market. The fruit had lot of nutritional value and benefits to body need. The value of star frit of nutritional Value per 100gm from the lab test at UPM Serdang are Calorie 24 kcal., Protein 0.7 g, Fat 1.9 g, Calcium 7 mg Iron 0.4 mg, Vitamin A 26 mg, Vitamin B1 0.07 mg, Vitamin B2 0.07 mg and Vitamin C 25.8 mg. Star fruit from Malaysia are exported to Europe Region about 60% of the whole industry. Malaysia star fruit provide Good Agriculture

Practices or MyGAP certification for export quality. Thanks!

Description: https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-XGyA4s_p5I8/VvzV_v3NK-I/AAAAAAAACsU/oOcs_SOeCb0yCMsyRLN1hXKSlmeMRAcKQ/s1600/bel1a.jpg

By,
M Anem,
Senior Agronomist,
Star Fruit Farm,
TKPM Batang Si, Kajang,
Selangor, Malaysia.
(23 JamadilAkhir 1437H)